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Yang, P, Zhang, L, Hong, G, Nasiri, SL, Baum, BA, Huang, HL, King, MD, Platnick, S (2007). Differences between collection 4 and 5 MODIS ice cloud optical/microphysical products and their impact on radiative forcing simulations. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, 45(9), 2886-2899.

Abstract
This paper reports on the comparison of two latest versions (collections 4 and 5) of ice cloud products derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements. The differences between the bulk optical properties of ice clouds used in collections 4 and 5 and the relevant impact on simulating the correlation of the bidirectional reflection functions at two MODIS bands centered at 0.65 (or 0.86) and 2.13 mu m are investigated. The level-3 MODIS ice cloud properties (specifically, ice cloud fraction, optical thickness, and effective particle size in this paper) from the collection 4 and 5 datasets; are compared for a tropical belt of 30 degrees S-30 degrees N. Furthermore, the impact of the differences between the MODIS collection 4 and 5 ice cloud products on the simulation of the radiative forcing of these clouds is investigated. Over the tropics, the averaged ice cloud fraction from collection 5 is 1. 1% more than the collection 4 counterpart, the averaged optical thickness from collection 5 is 1.2 larger than the collection 4 counterpart, and the averaged effective particle radius from collection 5 is 1.8 mu m smaller than the collection 4 counterpart. Moreover, the magnitude of the differences between collection 5 and 4 ice cloud properties also depends on the surface characteristics, i.e., over land or over ocean. The differences of these two datasets (collections 4 and 5) of cloud properties can have a significant impact on the simulation of the radiative forcing of ice clouds. In terms of total (longwave plus shortwave) cloud radiative forcing, the differences between the collection, 5 and 4 results are distributed primarily between -60 and 20 W . m(-2) but peak at 0 W . m(-2).

DOI:
10.1109/TGRS.2007.898276

ISSN:
0196-2892

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