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Prijith, SS; Aloysius, M; Mohan, M; Beegum, N; Moorthy, KK (2012). Role of circulation parameters in long range aerosol transport: Evidence from Winter-ICARB. JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL PHYSICS, 77, 144-151.

Abstract
This study explores the inevitable role of wind parameters such as wind speed, wind convergence and wind vorticity in the long range transport and distribution of aerosols in the winter time atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the campaign Winter ICARB. MODIS observed aerosol optical depth (AOD), with an excellent agreement with ship borne Microtops AOD, was found to increase over the BoB particularly, in the eastern parts during the course of the campaign. The influence of atmospheric circulation on this increase is examined using the wind field from NCEP reanalysis and computed wind convergence and vorticity for first and second halves (FH and SH) of the campaign along with a back trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model. While surface winds over the BoB remained nearly the same throughout the campaign denying the possibility of enhancement in marine aerosol generation, the higher altitude winds altered significantly in SH providing a channel for aerosol transport from the Indian landmass to the BoB in addition to the increased forest fire contribution from south Asia. This suggested mechanism is supported by CALIPSO aerosol extinction profiles over the eastern BoB and the surrounding land masses. Fine particle dominance in MODIS AOD and diminished correlation between ship borne AOD and surface aerosol mass measurements during SH corroborate this inference by indicating the presence of elevated aerosol layers, which can contribute substantially to the radiative effects of the earth-atmosphere system. This study throws light on the importance of wind convergence and vorticity in the investigations on the long range transport and spatial distribution of aerosols. (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

DOI:
1364-6826

ISSN:
10.1016/j.jastp.2011.12.008

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